USCCB Eucharistic Revival Begins Corpus Christi Feast Day – Arkansas Catholic

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The first national Eucharistic congress since 1976 is expected to attract between 60,000 and 100,000 people

Posted: June 14, 2022

CNS photo/Bob Roller

A priest holds the Eucharist in this undated file photo. The three-year Eucharistic Revival of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops will culminate with a five-day National Eucharistic Congress in Indianapolis July 17-21, 2024 and end on Pentecost Sunday, June 8, 2025.

The three-year Eucharistic Revival in the American Church will officially begin in the Diocese of Little Rock with two Masses on Saturday, June 18 for the feast of Corpus Christi.

Bishop Anthony B. Taylor will celebrate Mass at St. Andrew’s Cathedral in Little Rock at 4:30 p.m. while Fr. John Connell, Vicar General and Pastor of St. Raphael’s Church in Springdale, will celebrate Mass at St. Vincent’s Church from Paul to Rogers at 5 p.m.

The three-year Eucharistic Revival of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops will culminate with a five-day National Eucharistic Congress in Indianapolis July 17-21, 2024 and conclude on Pentecost Sunday, June 8, 2025. This will be the first Eucharistic Congress since 1976 and is expected to attract between 60,000 and 100,000 people.

With a vote of 201 in favor, 17 against and five abstentions, the bishops approved the revival at their general assembly in Baltimore on November 17 to address the scandal, division and doubt facing the American Church, according to eucharisticrevival.org, a USCCB-sponsored organization. website explaining the event.

“As Bishop Taylor recently mentioned, there are many Catholics who may not understand all the mysteries of the Eucharist. He was born to ensure that the Eucharist is the center of our faith and to rekindle the hearts of all who believe.

“The Eucharistic revival was born out of the direction of the USCCB to rekindle in people’s hearts the love of the Eucharist, to know the Eucharist better and to see the fruits of the Eucharist, as we are sent to mission,” said Father Juan Guido, director of the Diocese’s Office of Divine Worship and pastor of Christ the King Church in Fort Smith. “As Bishop Taylor recently mentioned, there are many Catholics who don’t understand perhaps not all the mysteries of the Eucharist.He was born to ensure that the Eucharist is the center of our faith and to rekindle the hearts of all who believe.

He added that revival was established to “inspire and prepare the people of God to be formed, healed, converted, united and sent into a suffering and hungry world through a renewed encounter with Jesus in the Eucharist – the source and the pinnacle of our Catholic faith.

Each revival year has a strategic direction for training and missionary discipleship. The first year (2022-2023) is a year of diocesan renewal centered on the mystery of the Eucharist in the life of the Church, the second year (2023-2024) will be a year of parish renewal centered on catechetical studies on the real presence of Christ and other activities to enable deeper encounters with Our Lord in the Eucharist and the third year (2024-2025) will begin with the National Eucharistic Congress, which “will prepare the faithful throughout the country to go out to the outskirts of their communities as ‘Eucharistic missionaries’.

In the face of geopolitical crises, scandals, social unrest, heightened polarization, and the need for recovery and renewal from the COVID-19 pandemic, Bishops have endorsed revival in hopes of fostering healing, unification of the American Church, faith formation and conversion. They pointed to several factors explaining the need for revival, including a 2019 Pew Research Center survey that claimed to find that only about a third of American Catholics believed in the real presence of Jesus in the Eucharist, reports that more than 30% of Catholics have not returned to in-person Mass after the pandemic and news that among millennials — those born between 1981 and 1996 — more than 40% identify as “unaffiliated” with any religion.

At the general assembly in Baltimore in November, Auxiliary Bishop Andrew H. Cozzens of St. Paul and Minneapolis, who was recently named Bishop of Crookston, Minnesota, and chairman of the USCCB Committee on Evangelism and catechesis, said he hopes the revival will be a time of healing for the whole Church as well as a movement of evangelism and a revival of understanding of the sacrament of the Eucharist for Catholics across the country.


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